13
Jul
12

Day twenty

Today we began our official World Choir Games . . . stuff. We went to our performance locations and got to practice there for 10 minutes per section (so the two performances in the Masonic Hall got two consecutive practices = 20 minutes). Walk on, try to centre on the stage, practice the bits we need to know the acoustics of, continue to try to centre, walk off (try to remember where we were that was centred and try to mentally fix that position some more for the Real Thing).

We had a short break for food and got to wander around a bit before meeting together again for a short rehearsal of Slangpolska. It’s one of our main choralography pieces, but when we compete we know we’re judged on our sound rather than our moves, so we try to pull it back and figure out how much movement adds to the piece and whether it’s worth having this or that. We want the music to sound the best, and sometimes the movement helps because it gets us in the right frame of mind, but sometimes the movement means we don’t focus well enough on the sound, and the sound is the priority.

Eventually at 4pm we met in Hall 1C of the Duke Centre, which was like a big warehouse. All the choirs in the World Choir Games arrived bit by bit over the next hour or two, and we rehearsed and sang and mingled. Then eventually at 6pm we began the parade that heralded the start of the World Choir Games (champions’ division). A USA choir that was performing at the opening went first, then our column went, led by the Greek flag (I thought they may have been the hosts of the next games, but I’m informed that’s Latvia), then good ol’ Australia! It pays off, starting with A.

It felt very much like the Olympics. Some streets had been closed to traffic so that we could all pass through, and people were on either side, waving and cheering. We waved our flags and cheered and sang. It was great. When we eventually arrived at Fountain Square the USA choir was singing along to some music playing in the background and we gladly joined in. They had some dance moves that we tried to imitate, but a lot of it needed more co-ordination than I could muster.

There were speeches and music, and it was a great opening to the World Choir Games. We’re all really looking forward to it. Tomorrow we have a Celebration Concert, which is a performance but not competition event. Our events are coming up on Thursday (since I’m not posting on quite the right days, I’ll point out that that’s the day after tomorrow as this is being written), and Friday. Not long now!

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4 Responses to “Day twenty”


  1. 1 tom davison
    July 13, 2012 at 14:10

    Go you soaring, searing, scintillating, sonorous, stupendous sopranos;
    you alive, alert, almighty, altruistic, alleluia altos;
    you tender, trilling, tremulous, technical, terrific, tendentious tenors;
    you beautiful boys at the back with the bad-ass attitude.

    Go you good thing – UoNCC:-)

  2. 2 Judi walker
    July 13, 2012 at 16:04

    What time on Tuesday do you expect to get back to Newie? Need to plan some stuff ASAP. Thanks.

  3. 4 Penny Spencer
    July 13, 2012 at 18:53

    Hi everyone,
    missing you all and wishing I was there, and sending you all heaps of love and best wishes. Would love to see some blogs from others, even a short paragraph would be great 🙂 I watched the UN concert, well, the part with you in it….why is no-one smiling? Enjoy the moment! Live it, love it! It’s a fantastic opportunity that may never come again, so let everyone see why we do what we do…because we love to sing!!
    hoping to come back to choir when you get home,
    Penny


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